Our 5 free and paid Android/iOS apps of the week

They range from mobile games that will help you blow some steam to productivity apps. Here are the 5 free and paid Android/iOS apps that stood out for us this week at NextPit.

Camera Translator helps you translate an unknown word

Camera Translator is an application that has a very narrow niche that I found to be very helpful in my case. It is not too far removed from the likes of Google Translator and numerous other apps of a similar nature, with Camera Translator enabling you to translate text from photos.

However, there is one difference: Google Translate will attempt to translate all of the text or scan the entire block of text, but Camera Translator will only focus on a particular word.

Sounds gimped, doesn’t it? Hold your horses before you make a harsh judgment. Personally, I still often have to look up some English words between two pages of Dune, which I’m reading right now. The same problem occurs when I read the local news in Berlin in the German language.

I don’t want to translate the entire page or article and instead would want to check out just one particular word that remains unknown to me. Camera Translator fits this niche perfectly and also enables you to save each translated word and its corresponding translation. The application is free without any irritating in-app purchases and does not require an account. However, there are ads that appear in the form of banners.

Camera Translator allows you to translate single words with your smartphone camera / © NextPit

You can download the Camera Translator application from the Google Play Store

Hypernotes: Get collaborative and organized with your notes

Hypernotes is a collaborative note-taking app that is deceptively simple. The application aims to optimize the organization and augmentation of a slew of notes based on the “Zettelkasten” method.

Zettelkasten is, of course, a German invention. It works on the presupposition that over the course of time, you would have accumulated a mountain of notes through events, thoughts, and interesting snippets of information acquired. These notes will be organized in a hierarchy that allows them to be classified into a more systematic manner, where they will contain metadata or “markers” (numbers, letters, colors) that allow them to be associated with one another. Sort of mind-mapping, but for notes.

That is how it works in theory. In practical terms, Hypernotes enable you to link several notes together, to split a long note on a particular subject into several thematic sub-sections, to automate link suggestions to be made between separate notes, and to create a list of all the notes that you want to link together. It also enables you to automate suggested links between separate notes, where you can then visualize the overall picture better via tree diagrams so that you can access them quickly.

Personally, I find the application to be rather difficult to grasp in the beginning, especially since I am far from being an organized person. However, I can imagine myself using Hypernotes to prepare a long article or an entire editorial file and not lose my train of thought. Fret not, Hypernotes comes with a rather complete tutorial.

The application is free without any ads, but the free version limits you to two Notebooks (that can be filled with notes) subject to a maximum of 2 users and a file limit of 600 MB. If you think that such limitations are insufficient for your needs, then you can opt for a paid fee of anywhere from €8 to €19 per user, depending on the package that you need.

Hypernotes seems to target companies, but individuals can also use it / © NextPit

You can download the Hypernotes application from the Google Play Store.

Easy DND, an accessible Do Not Disturb mode

Easy DND is an application that combines the functions of the Do Not Disturb mode in Android, bringing them together in an interface that is more accessible, easy-to-use, and colorful.

The idea is to make all the Do Not Disturb mode settings available at the tip of your fingertips without having to jump through hoops. You can activate DND mode to all notifications or filter them by priority while customizing settings to include exceptions. You can also set a timer to disable DND mode after a certain time. In short, the interface is self-explanatory, it is that simple. 

There are no ads to contend with, and you do not even need to create an account. A paid option will cost you €2.69 (one-time purchase) that gives you far more options and flexibility in the DND mode settings.

Easy DND is also very easy to use / © NextPit

You can download Easy DND from the Google Play Store.

Last Time, a reverse planner that helps you retrace your steps

If you have the memory of a squirrel monkey where you can’t even remember what you had for dinner last night, fret not. There is an app out there that can help you. Some of us need tools to help us remember when we last purchased the box of surgical masks or the last time we changed the bedsheets. Where was the cobbler located when I repaired my favorite pair of shoes? Last Time is an application that will hopefully do its bit to help you remember what you did at a certain time in the past. 

The application works like a reverse planner. Instead of using it to plan out your schedule, it looks backward by creating a historical timeline of what you did at a particular given time, with specifications such as where, when, with whom, etc.

Last Time will show these actions as a timeline so that you can retrace your activities at a glance. You can also record notes with each event entry, check out the elapsed time between entries, as well as the elapsed time from the creation of each entry.

You can also schedule notifications to remind you of your events. Adaptive notifications will intelligently adapt to your last entry for each event and send you a reminder at the appropriate time. The interface is clean and very easy to understand.

The app is free without any ads or in-app purchases to deal with. You also do not need to have an account since it works offline. No danger of identity theft here!

Last Time is a great way to keep track of your daily routine / © NextPit

You can download Last Time from the Google Play Store

Pigeon: A Love Story will spice up your weekend with a unique premise

Pigeon: A Love Story is a game that is extremely unique with a very special premise that can be difficult to find elsewhere. The game’s concept is fully experimental and does go off the rails somewhat. You are a pigeon in this game, flying over the city of London which has been reproduced in full 3D glory according to scale.

The game’s goal is to explore the city from above in your quest to find your soul mate. The problem is, unlike many other mobile games that force you to go through a seemingly endless tutorial before letting you play, Pigeon: A Love Story lets you figure things out by yourself right from the get-go. 

There are no clues, no objectives, no mission reminders, or other pointers to help you out. The only thing you know is this: your soulmate is “your pigeon-shaped soulmate”, according to the game description. There is only one problem with this: there are many pigeons in this game (1 million of them!).

Personally, I still haven’t found my soulmate yet but I enjoyed finding some key places or landmarks of London that are worth admiring. In fact, the map of London is broadcasted in real-time based on actual map data, which requires a 4G or Wi-Fi connection to have it work well. An offline version also exists, but you end up in a pre-recorded, randomly generated map instead.

I found the game to be visually appealing and it does seem to be rather resource-intensive, so you would need a decently powered smartphone to fully enjoy it. The soundtrack has an almost epic or fantasy feel to it to boot. I think it’s worth the entry price of €1.09.


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