Experiment: Replacing my notebook with the Motorola Edge 20 Pro for a week

Motorola certainly deserves a pat on the back by equipping the new Motorola Edge 20 Pro with a desktop mode known as “Ready for” while offering decent performance. Powered by the Snapdragon 870 SoC and 12 GB RAM, it is supposed to replace computers and gaming consoles.

I’m going to see whether it lives up to such a reputation by replacing my laptop with the Motorola Edge 20 Pro for a week and still get my work done for NextPit. In this article, I want to know whether you have any questions about the Edge 20 Pro and your notebook usage!

My old notebooks have seen better days, because Motorola now offers the “Ready For” mode! This phrase describes much enthusiasm as I attended Motorola’s event a few days ago.

The Edge 20 Pro is a rather uncharacteristic device by Motorola as it can pass as a genuine Android flagship. Underneath the hood lies a Snapdragon 870 SoC that genuinely showed off its capability in the Vivo X60 Pro 5G review, in addition to a respectable 12 GB of RAM.

Motorola will also throw in an adapter with the Edge 20 Pro that offers USB-C to HDMI connectivity while enabling you to connect to a charger simultaneously. To provide some context to my review, I will try an experiment: Can the Motorola Edge 20 Pro replace my notebook and my smartphone for an entire week? In return, I’ll tell you what I do with my notebook, or rather, my notebooks!

Motorola Edge 20 vs. Xiaomi, Huawei and Sony

Strictly speaking, I use two notebooks alternately every single day! For work, I use a Huawei MateBook 14 that sports 8 GB RAM and an AMD Ryzen 5 processor. The notebook runs on Windows 10, and all the articles from me that you currently read on NextPit were written using this laptop.

For personal use, I occasionally use my ancient Xiaomi MiBook 13 with ElementaryOS, a featherweight Linux distribution. I usually hook it up to an external monitor, while typing on a Logitech MX keyboard alongside a Logitech M720 Triathlon wireless mouse. Both the mouse and the keyboard are Bluetooth-enabled, so they work well with the Motorola Edge 20.

The Edge 20 series from Motorola also offers the “Ready For” mode wirelessly / © Motorola

As for my smartphone, I’m still using the Sony Xperia 1 III after reviewing it, where I transferred my SIM card to the Edge 20 this morning. And yes, I’m already typing this article on the smartphone, which is connected to my screen as a computer. This week, I’ll try to keep up with the experiment as best I can. But if a problem arises that prevents me from working too much, I will switch to the MateBook 14. In order to do that, I will need a little help from you guys!

Any questions about using smartphone as a PC?

After all, the topic of “using your smartphone as a PC” is not really new. Samsung has offered such a feature on its smartphones for ages with DeX. Nevertheless, I suspect that most people will stick to notebooks and PCs, but why? What daily use cases are you skeptical about when it comes to using a smartphone as a notebook replacement?

Please write me scenarios where you suspect problems will arise when replacing your notebook with a smartphone as your primary productivity tool in the comments. Even though I work with computers every day, edit pictures, and type short stories, I don’t have all scenarios at the tip of my fingertips so far. Why not join in on the fun and send me your questions and suggestions in the comments?


Source